Hallowed Ground

Death, Death all around! Boom, whiz, crash – severed limbs, blood and gore! 100,000 in this battle, 70,000 in the next. Who are they? So many – approximately 75% buried without names – just never going home again. What? Where? Right here!After the Battle

After the Battle

Anita and I have spent the last few days walking on hallowed ground, immersed in the stories of the Civil War. Battle of Bull Run where it started, Fredericksburg, Sunken Road, Chancellorsville, Battle of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, The Breakthrough, culminating where it ended at Appomattox Court House. Did you know that it wasn’t until during the Vietnam War that the number of American deaths in foreign wars eclipsed the number who died in the Civil War?map3

Virginia, so rich in history, was the epicenter of the war and the 110-mile corridor between the two capitals, Richmond and Washington DC, saw many bloody battles. We enjoyed the National Museum of the Civil War Soldier at Pamplin Historical Park. Hearing the stories of soldier experiences in their own words and seeing the way they lived.

Stonewall Jackson

Stonewall Jackson Statue at Bull Run

Home riddled with bullets during along the Sunken Road.

Home riddled with bullets  along the Sunken Road.

McLean House where Lee Surrendered

McLean House where Lee Surrendered

At Pamplin Historic Park

At Pamplin Historic Park

But not all our time was in the Civil War. We visited the house that Charles Washington (brother to George) built in 1760. It was converted into the Rising Sun Tavern where Thomas Jefferson drafted the statute that set the pattern for religious freedom in the US.

Tavvern of the Rising Sun

Rising Sun Tavern

The Chatham Plantation where Clara Barton an early founder of the American Red Cross assisted in caring for Union Soldiers. And so many beautiful Fredericksburg homes built in the 1700s.

1820s home in Fredricksburg

1820s home in Fredricksburg

view from Chatham to Fredricksbutg

view from Chatham to Fredricksbutg

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